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Newer Perspectives on Domestic Violence

April 1, 2010  |  Posted by Psychiatric Times | No Comments
Domestic Violence (DV) and all its consequences is a terribly sad, troubling, and potentially destructive part of our national life and identity. DV not only poses physical dangers but also takes a terrible toll on families and the important relationships of our lives. One would have thought that we, as a nation, would use reason, science and logic to solve—-as much as full solution is possible—-this scourge. Perhaps naturally and understandably, considering how emotional these issues are, science, perspective, study, and thoughtfulness have often been put aside while warring camps, political concerns and emotions have carried the day. Domestic violence can be seen in many different ways but certainly a medical/scientific approach is warranted, with much to offer if real solutions are to be found.
My first exposure to electronic medical records (EMRs) was when I saw my own primary care physician about 3 years ago. I didn't like it. Neither did he. For me, it seemed like he had to pay as much attention to the computer as to me. We spent less time talking. He laughed as he typed, joking that once everything was in the computer, it should save time and make for better care. I responded that we heard the same promise with managed care.

In the Eye of the Beholder?

April 1, 2010  |  Posted by Psychiatric Times | No Comments
A new study sheds some light on the pathogenesis of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Feusner and colleagues from UCLA, whose study was recently published in Archives of General Psychiatry, used functional MRI to determine whether patients with BDD have abnormal patterns of brain activation when visually processing their own face. The severity of symptoms of this disorder were found to correlate with activity in frontostriatal systems and the visual cortex. http://archpsyc.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/67/2/197

In the Eye of the Beholder?

April 1, 2010  |  Posted by Psychiatric Times | No Comments
A new study sheds some light on the pathogenesis of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Feusner and colleagues from UCLA, whose study was recently published in Archives of General Psychiatry, used functional MRI to determine whether patients with BDD have abnormal patterns of brain activation when visually processing their own face. The severity of symptoms of this disorder were found to correlate with activity in frontostriatal systems and the visual cortex. http://archpsyc.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/67/2/197

Depression Is a Thief—Even When We Learn From It

March 31, 2010  |  Posted by Psychiatric Times | No Comments
I’ll gladly wager that few who have experienced severe depression would recommend it to friends and family as a “great learning experience.”